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Aug 13, 2016 14:18:13   #
sgbrown
 
I recently purchased a new Canon Rebel T6i and a new 150-600mm zoom lens. I am still having trouble getting the detail that I want. I know it must be me not using the correct setting. I hope someone can look at my photo and setting and give me some suggestions on what I might do to get better results. The picture was taken with the following settings: f/5.6, 1/125 sec., ISO-400, 150mm. Any advice would be appreciated! :)


 
Aug 13, 2016 14:28:41   #
cmc65 (a regular here)
 
Did u use a tripod?
Aug 13, 2016 15:04:12   #
sgbrown
 
No, I didn't. I was hoping I could get better detail without. I am usually very steady, but this lens is much heavier than my other. I am just going to hate to have to depend on a tripod for better detail. :)
Aug 13, 2016 15:06:11   #
SonyA580
 
It's hard to tell on such a low resolution picture, but to me, it looks OK. If you are talking about detail in the background grass, your aperture of f/5.6 simply won't give you enough depth of field to get everything behind the tree in focus. I would have probably zoomed in to 200-300mm and shot it as a vertical picture trying to eliminate the background.
Aug 13, 2016 15:13:57   #
R.G. (a regular here)
 
sgbrown wrote:
......I am just going to hate to have to depend on a tripod for better detail. :)


A tripod is a good idea, but if you hate the idea so much, how about a monopod, or as I do quite a lot, use a tripod with just the front leg extended and use it as a monopod. That way you'll always have the tripod with you for those times when you need it.
Aug 13, 2016 16:22:54   #
Rongnongno (a regular here)
 
ALWAYS post an original in this forum section if you want help....
 
Aug 14, 2016 07:42:57   #
RonnieP
 
The rule of thumb I learned many years ago, was set the shutter speed at 1 over the focal length of the lens. For a zoom lens, always 1 over the longest focal length. It also helps to fudge that shutter speed higher. With the new cameras, increasing the ISO to allow for this is an option. When I tried it, I needed to find the ISO where noise became an issue. I shoot a Nikon D7100 and sometimes use a Tamron 150-600. I usually set the ISO at 1600 or 3200, use shutter priority at 1/1600 sec on bright days and the sharpness has gotten to where it should be.

BTW, my lens is a bear to handhold - period. I generally use a monopod in the field. That also doubles as a walking stick on occasion.
Aug 14, 2016 07:57:22   #
legion3
 
shutter speed need to be 600 plus also try higher f stop
Aug 14, 2016 08:02:30   #
R.G. (a regular here)
 
RonnieP wrote:
....I generally use a monopod in the field. That also doubles as a walking stick on occasion.


Very useful for negotiating steep slippery banks, rocky terrain etc.
Aug 14, 2016 08:53:17   #
OnDSnap
 
Rongnongno wrote:
ALWAYS post an original in this forum section if you want help....


Aug 14, 2016 10:12:43   #
Nalu
 
Tough to hold a big lens like that at 1/125, even at 150mm. Shoot faster and for relatively static subjects, use a good tripod with a gimbal head. New lens? Practice makes perfect.
 
Aug 14, 2016 10:14:51   #
Mark7829
 
find better light. find low light , early morning or late afternoon with the direction of light coming from the side from 45-85 degrees. This side light adds wonderful detail. With light behind you, the image will be flat. Late a midday and around midday will produce shadows and highlights that hide detail. Overcast and defused light as you have posted is soft light which is highly desirable to many images.
Aug 14, 2016 10:18:02   #
bigwolf40 (a regular here)
 
sgbrown wrote:
I recently purchased a new Canon Rebel T6i and a new 150-600mm zoom lens. I am still having trouble getting the detail that I want. I know it must be me not using the correct setting. I hope someone can look at my photo and setting and give me some suggestions on what I might do to get better results. The picture was taken with the following settings: f/5.6, 1/125 sec., ISO-400, 150mm. Any advice would be appreciated! :)


Use BBF, Center Spot metering, and higher shutter speed. You don't need to use a tripod on a moving subject. People on this site seem to think a tripod is the answer to everything. Tripods are good for still subjects using slow shutter speeds. I found for me they are a pain in the neck to use....Rich
Aug 14, 2016 10:37:37   #
CPR
 
Most zoom lenses are sharpest at about their midpoint. That may help. Also faster shutter and more DOF may make it easier to get the shot you want.
Many of the photos you see that are tack sharp have been sharpened in post-processing and you can't get them that sharp out of the camera.
Aug 14, 2016 11:56:41   #
jeep_daddy (a regular here)
 
sgbrown wrote:
I recently purchased a new Canon Rebel T6i and a new 150-600mm zoom lens. I am still having trouble getting the detail that I want. I know it must be me not using the correct setting. I hope someone can look at my photo and setting and give me some suggestions on what I might do to get better results. The picture was taken with the following settings: f/5.6, 1/125 sec., ISO-400, 150mm. Any advice would be appreciated! :)


You want to employ a faster shutter speed. In this image, I'd guess that the squirrel is in the shade otherwise you would have had a faster shutter speed at f/5.6 and ISO400. For us to examine your images closer, always check the little checkbox that says (store original) This allows us to see the image full size, and see the EXIF Metadata. Next time you are shooting handheld, keep your shutter speed at least double the inverse of your focal length. In other words, at 150mm, use at least 1/300th of a second handheld. At 600mm use at least 1/1200th of a second shutter. To be honest with you, it's best to shoot at 1/1000th or faster at any focal length when taking pictures of animals, as animals are unpredictable and may move at any moment.
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