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Using Flash in Auto and Aperture Mode - Help
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Oct 25, 2015 14:22:28   #
Moose
 
Attached are two pictures shot using my Panasonic FZ200 camera. Each taken with the camera flash and Auto ISO. No exposure compensation.
Photo P1030206 shot in Auto mode which set the camera to ISO 800, F2.8 and speed 1/8 sec.
Photo P1030207 shot in Aperture mode and the ISO was automatically set to 400 and speed at 1/60. The fstop was f5.6.

Notice the warmth of the first picture vs. the other one. Colors are true with the 306 photo, but a bit darker and cold looking in the 307 photo. What made that happen? I’m about to use Auto for all my photos requiring flash, but would like to know how to make them look the same using Aperture, etc.

Also, since this is a point and shoot camera, would the same situation occur with non - p&s cameras?

Thanks for your help.
P1030206 Auto Mode
P1030206 Auto Mode...
(Download)
P1030207 Aperture Mode
P1030207 Aperture Mode...
(Download)
 
Oct 25, 2015 14:28:22   #
rgrenaderphoto (a regular here)
 
IMHO, you need to investigate a hot shoe attached speedlight and bounce flash. You'll get superior lighting for interior shots.
Oct 25, 2015 14:35:31   #
Dngallagher (a regular here)
 
Moose wrote:
Attached are two pictures shot using my Panasonic FZ200 camera. Each taken with the camera flash and Auto ISO. No exposure compensation.
Photo P1030206 shot in Auto mode which set the camera to ISO 800, F2.8 and speed 1/8 sec.
Photo P1030207 shot in Aperture mode and the ISO was automatically set to 400 and speed at 1/60. The fstop was f5.6.

Notice the warmth of the first picture vs. the other one. Colors are true with the 306 photo, but a bit darker and cold looking in the 307 photo. What made that happen? I’m about to use Auto for all my photos requiring flash, but would like to know how to make them look the same using Aperture, etc.

Also, since this is a point and shoot camera, would the same situation occur with non - p&s cameras?

Thanks for your help.
Attached are two pictures shot using my Panasonic ... (show quote)


In auto mode, your camera opened up the aperture and increased ISO to make use of ambient lighting, as well as using 1/8 for shutter, flash froze everything so there was minimal camera shake recorded. So everything ended up brighter and warmer.

In the Aperture priority, you locked aperture on 5.6, ISO was down to 400 and shutter speed was 1/60 so it relied on the flash for almost all of the light.

The auto modes, even when used partially can be problematic, especially for me. I tend to shoot on manual, sometimes with auto ISO with a max setting to reduce noise.

I also use a hot shoe flash that provides a strong flash to reach more than 10-12 feet.

Will it occur with non p&s cameras? Sure will. I struggled with that for quite awhile.
Oct 25, 2015 14:37:31   #
Wendy2
 
I've noticed this too with my photography. I shoot in manual and use flash, but never on the camera. I will shoot a scene and it looks one way, then change the settings, maybe a different aperture, and the scene takes on a different color as well. Or I will shoot a scene without flash, one color, then use flash and it either warms it or cools it.

I really don't understand this aspect of photography and would love to hear from anyone that can explain.
Oct 25, 2015 14:50:07   #
Moose
 
Dngallagher wrote:

In the Aperture priority, you locked aperture on 5.6, ISO was down to 400 and shutter speed was 1/60 so it relied on the flash for almost all of the light.


Thanks Dn for your response. In your comment regarding the ISO went down to 400, the auto ISO set that as well.

I did try this out with my speed light and the same thing happened. Used the TTL mode on the flash.

Seems like I've got a lot of experimenting to do to find the right settings before I go out shooting. I was at an 1840's village yesterday and tried to use flash in the dark areas, using Aperture mode and they all turned out dark. Use Auto mode and it worked out pretty good.


Thanks again for your comments.
Oct 25, 2015 14:50:46   #
Moose
 
Wendy as you can see I'm in the same boat as you. Lot to learn.


Wendy2 wrote:
I've noticed this too with my photography. I shoot in manual and use flash, but never on the camera. I will shoot a scene and it looks one way, then change the settings, maybe a different aperture, and the scene takes on a different color as well. Or I will shoot a scene without flash, one color, then use flash and it either warms it or cools it.

I really don't understand this aspect of photography and would love to hear from anyone that can explain.
 
Oct 25, 2015 14:51:39   #
Moose
 
Thanks rg for your comments. I do have a speed light, but I got the same problem with it.

rgrenaderphoto wrote:
IMHO, you need to investigate a hot shoe attached speedlight and bounce flash. You'll get superior lighting for interior shots.
Oct 25, 2015 15:15:31   #
Dngallagher (a regular here)
 
Moose wrote:
Thanks Dn for your response. In your comment regarding the ISO went down to 400, the auto ISO set that as well.

I did try this out with my speed light and the same thing happened. Used the TTL mode on the flash.

Seems like I've got a lot of experimenting to do to find the right settings before I go out shooting. I was at an 1840's village yesterday and tried to use flash in the dark areas, using Aperture mode and they all turned out dark. Use Auto mode and it worked out pretty good.


Thanks again for your comments.
Thanks Dn for your response. In your comment rega... (show quote)


Great, when you finally get it definitively, post and let me know ;)

I still struggle with flash sometimes!
Oct 25, 2015 16:21:48   #
wayne-03
 
Moose wrote:
Attached are two pictures shot using my Panasonic FZ200 camera. Each taken with the camera flash and Auto ISO. No exposure compensation.
Photo P1030206 shot in Auto mode which set the camera to ISO 800, F2.8 and speed 1/8 sec.
Photo P1030207 shot in Aperture mode and the ISO was automatically set to 400 and speed at 1/60. The fstop was f5.6.

Notice the warmth of the first picture vs. the other one. Colors are true with the 306 photo, but a bit darker and cold looking in the 307 photo. What made that happen? I’m about to use Auto for all my photos requiring flash, but would like to know how to make them look the same using Aperture, etc.

Also, since this is a point and shoot camera, would the same situation occur with non - p&s cameras?

Thanks for your help.
Attached are two pictures shot using my Panasonic ... (show quote)



You guys are comparing apples to oranges. Take a picture in the full auto mode. Note all of your settings, ISO, Shutter Speed, Aperture, White Balance and write them down. Now set you camera to full manual mode and duplicate your auto settings. Take another picture and they will be the same.

All of your auto modes (auto, program, shutter priority and aperture priority) run on a different program. If you take four photographers and give them all the same equipment and have the take a portrait of the same person, you will get four different pictures. And so it is with your camera, your challenge is to learn how each of those four (auto, program, shutter priority and aperture priority) photographers think. Or, just shoot in manual and you do all the thinking.

Wayne
AUTO
AUTO...
(Download)
MANUAL
MANUAL...
(Download)
COMPARISON
COMPARISON...
(Download)
Oct 25, 2015 16:42:22   #
Izza1967
 
Wayne, your Auto shot is slightly warmer than the manual though I do agree with you that if you copy the auto settings into manual mode the result should be exactly the same, unless of course the ambient light changes slightly.
Oct 25, 2015 16:56:44   #
wayne-03
 
If you can see that one is warmer that the other, then your eyes are much better that mine. If you downloaded them and looked at the data, one is 5350/+3 and the other is 5450/+5 , and that proves my point. In any auto mode there will always be minor changes. Who can control the light? We can only hope to learn how to use it. But you are right, I should have set a custom white balance and then they would have been the same.
 
Oct 26, 2015 10:58:55   #
Wendy2
 
wayne-03 wrote:
You guys are comparing apples to oranges. Take a picture in the full auto mode. Note all of your settings, ISO, Shutter Speed, Aperture, White Balance and write them down. Now set you camera to full manual mode and duplicate your auto settings. Take another picture and they will be the same.

All of your auto modes (auto, program, shutter priority and aperture priority) run on a different program. If you take four photographers and give them all the same equipment and have the take a portrait of the same person, you will get four different pictures. And so it is with your camera, your challenge is to learn how each of those four (auto, program, shutter priority and aperture priority) photographers think. Or, just shoot in manual and you do all the thinking.

Wayne
You guys are comparing apples to oranges. Take a p... (show quote)


I have done this and they aren't always the same! It may have something to do with settings that have been customized in camera.

I also see that your auto shot is a bit warmer.
Oct 26, 2015 12:31:22   #
wayne-03
 
Wendy2 wrote:
I have done this and they aren't always the same! It may have something to do with settings that have been customized in camera.

I also see that your auto shot is a bit warmer.




Wendy

There is a very slight difference in the white balance. That’s because I left the white balance at Auto. Had I done a custom white balance they would have both been the same. Anytime you use an auto function there will be a difference from one picture to the next.

The first picture was taking in the (green) Program Mode. The setting that the camera choose were, Shutter Speed = 1/60, Aperture = f-4.0, ISO = 100, White Balance = Custom (7250/+19). The second picture was taken in Manual Mode with exactly the same settings.

Don
AUTO
AUTO...
(Download)
MANUAL
MANUAL...
(Download)
SIDE BY SIDE
SIDE BY SIDE...
(Download)
Oct 26, 2015 16:15:07   #
Dngallagher (a regular here)
 
wayne-03 wrote:
Wendy

There is a very slight difference in the white balance. That’s because I left the white balance at Auto. Had I done a custom white balance they would have both been the same. Anytime you use an auto function there will be a difference from one picture to the next.

The first picture was taking in the (green) Program Mode. The setting that the camera choose were, Shutter Speed = 1/60, Aperture = f-4.0, ISO = 100, White Balance = Custom (7250/+19). The second picture was taken in Manual Mode with exactly the same settings.

Don
Wendy br br There is a very slight difference in ... (show quote)



If you compare histograms for both images, there are slight differences, and the differences effect the images, even seen by my old eyes, at least it seems so....

They are very slight, but easy to see when toggling between the two images in Lightroom.
AUTO
AUTO...
MANUAL
MANUAL...
Oct 26, 2015 16:17:39   #
wayne-03
 
Dngallagher wrote:
If you compare histograms for both images, there are slight differences, and the differences effect the images, even seen by my old eyes, at least it seems so....

They are very slight, but easy to see when toggling between the two images in Lightroom.


I give up.
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