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Photo Gallery
Old dugout homes in Kansas
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Feb 18, 2012 21:41:36   #
Rbo36
 
While driving the backroads in the Flint Hill in Kansas we came across these interesting old homes. The first picture is a dugout that is about 10 feet wide and 12 feet deep and 7 feet high inside. The other two we did got go into.
These were some of the earliest type of homes in an area where wood was not available.
Dugout in Flint Hills of Kansas

Dugout West of Imporia Kansas

Dugout by Alta Vist Kansas

Stone dugout

 
Feb 18, 2012 22:07:25   #
RMM
 
Very interesting! Do you have any information about the age of these dugouts, or who lived in them? Settlers? Indians? Trappers?
Feb 19, 2012 07:44:11   #
Rbo36
 
RMM wrote:
Very interesting! Do you have any information about the age of these dugouts, or who lived in them? Settlers? Indians? Trappers?


I'm sorry I don't. I would love to know more about them myself.
Feb 19, 2012 09:43:58   #
Rbo36
 
Rbo36 wrote:
RMM wrote:
Very interesting! Do you have any information about the age of these dugouts, or who lived in them? Settlers? Indians? Trappers?


I'm sorry I don't. I would love to know more about them myself.


This morning I gleaned this information off the internet.
"Another unique use of the post rock was for stone arch caves, which farmers needed for shelter from storms, tornadoes and a storage place for farm products. The typical method for building caves was to lay stone blocks for the base of the cave walls to a height of about a foot. Wood forms for the arch were set on the wall bases and boards placed over the forms made a solid arch. Stone blocks were then laid over those boards. When laying the blocks was completed, the wood forms were knocked out. The stone arch (the cave wall) would stay. Mortar was not necessary as pressure from the stone would hold the arch in shape."
It would according to this appear that they were not used so much for perminant dwellings.
Feb 19, 2012 09:44:38   #
HeartGem
 
Great photos!
Try contacting the Kansas Historical Society. They will probably be able to give you some information.
Feb 19, 2012 10:02:18   #
bobmcculloch
 
RMM wrote:
Very interesting! Do you have any information about the age of these dugouts, or who lived in them? Settlers? Indians? Trappers?


Try Googling "kansas dugouts " also "soddies" seems to me Nat Geo did an article several years ago on these homes, not interested enough to do furthur googling myself, Bob.
 
Feb 19, 2012 10:33:03   #
wrr
 
Not sure if any of these pictured were actually homes or not, most look to be of the storm cellar nature. See them everywhere around here. Pretty much all the old homesteads had these stone structures and that's usually all that remains of the old places. I can probably find a dozen of them within 5 miles of me. I like poking around the old abandoned farms, doing a little metal detecting around the old foundation and so on. I stay clear of these storm cellars though, they are full of critters. From bobcats to snakes, you just never know what has claimed them as a home.
Feb 19, 2012 11:39:03   #
Farmers Wife
 
We call these cellars. It is used as a place to go tp during tornadoes. Also we keep canned goods and over winter our potatoes, onions, garlic and carrots in them.
Feb 19, 2012 14:34:14   #
Bunny-Jean
 
Very interesting subject, thanks for sharing photos and info!!!
Feb 19, 2012 17:12:50   #
Rbo36
 
bobmcculloch wrote:
RMM wrote:
Very interesting! Do you have any information about the age of these dugouts, or who lived in them? Settlers? Indians? Trappers?


Try Googling "kansas dugouts " also "soddies" seems to me Nat Geo did an article several years ago on these homes, not interested enough to do furthur googling myself, Bob.


Bob, In trying to answer another UHH's question about these dugouts I went to Google and typed in 'Old stone dugouts in Kansas' and the very first item that came up was my very own original post to UHH. I did not know that what we posted here went to Google!
Feb 19, 2012 17:15:43   #
sinatraman (first to hit 1k posts)
 
thank you for this thread. you taught me something. i find it fascinating
 
Feb 19, 2012 17:20:52   #
Rbo36
 
wrr wrote:
Not sure if any of these pictured were actually homes or not, most look to be of the storm cellar nature. See them everywhere around here. Pretty much all the old homesteads had these stone structures and that's usually all that remains of the old places. I can probably find a dozen of them within 5 miles of me. I like poking around the old abandoned farms, doing a little metal detecting around the old foundation and so on. I stay clear of these storm cellars though, they are full of critters. From bobcats to snakes, you just never know what has claimed them as a home.
Not sure if any of these pictured were actually ho... (show quote)


I believe you are right because I got the following information from a web site about post rock.

This morning I gleaned this information off the internet.
"Another unique use of the post rock was for stone arch caves, which farmers needed for shelter from storms, tornadoes and a storage place for farm products. The typical method for building caves was to lay stone blocks for the base of the cave walls to a height of about a foot. Wood forms for the arch were set on the wall bases and boards placed over the forms made a solid arch. Stone blocks were then laid over those boards. When laying the blocks was completed, the wood forms were knocked out. The stone arch (the cave wall) would stay. Mortar was not necessary as pressure from the stone would hold the arch in shape."
It would according to this appear that they were not used so much for perminant dwellings.
Feb 19, 2012 17:22:13   #
Rbo36
 
Bunny-Jean wrote:
Very interesting subject, thanks for sharing photos and info!!!


You are welcome.
Feb 19, 2012 17:23:41   #
Rbo36
 
Rbo36 wrote:
While driving the backroads in the Flint Hill in Kansas we came across these interesting old homes. The first picture is a dugout that is about 10 feet wide and 12 feet deep and 7 feet high inside. The other two we did got go into.
These were some of the earliest type of homes in an area where wood was not available.


The second picture got duplicated here. Sorry.
Feb 19, 2012 17:50:50   #
Farmers Wife
 
I should also add, wemwouldnstay and sleep in the cellar during the heat of the day and work early evening into the early morning when it was cooler. I remember we had ancard table set up ansd would play cards and games by oil lamp. Chores done at night was weeding and hoeing in the garden. Mowing the barn lot, cooking and canning. We didnt have air conditioningbso in August during the night wenwould wear wet towels and can tomatoes. My father was a very good photographer back then with his Argus C3
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