Ugly Hedgehog® - Photography Forum
Home | Photography Digest | Active Topics | Newest Pictures | Search | Login | Register | Help
Main Photography Discussion
Repair of Hoya Circular Polarizers?
(?)
If you would like to post a reply, then please login (if you already have an account) or register (if you don't).
Jul 8, 2013 10:20:11   #
Noela
 
I recently had a HOYA circular polarizer come apart in my hand. I have used it before without problem, but this time, perhaps due to the hot weather, I was unable to remove the filter from the lens, and as I was trying, the moving ring came off, along with a large black spring (which is what I think held it in place). I was unable to repair it, so I contacted HOYA to see if I could get a repair. While waiting for an answer, I have learned that this problem is apparently common, along with the filter being difficult to get off of the lens. I finally heard back from HOYA, but they have told me that I need to go back to the place that I bought it, but I can't do that, because it was a gift, and I don't know where it came from. Has anybody else run into this problem? Is it worth repairing? Should I get another brand to just replace it, and if so, which one? I've been looking at the B&W and Heliopan, how are they? Needless to say, any help or direction is greatly appreciated.
 
Jul 8, 2013 10:24:47   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
Noela wrote:
I recently had a HOYA circular polarizer come apart in my hand. I have used it before without problem, but this time, perhaps due to the hot weather, I was unable to remove the filter from the lens, and as I was trying, the moving ring came off, along with a large black spring (which is what I think held it in place). I was unable to repair it, so I contacted HOYA to see if I could get a repair. While waiting for an answer, I have learned that this problem is apparently common, along with the filter being difficult to get off of the lens. I finally heard back from HOYA, but they have told me that I need to go back to the place that I bought it, but I can't do that, because it was a gift, and I don't know where it came from. Has anybody else run into this problem? Is it worth repairing? Should I get another brand to just replace it, and if so, which one? I've been looking at the B&W and Heliopan, how are they? Needless to say, any help or direction is greatly appreciated.
I recently had a HOYA circular polarizer come apar... (show quote)

If you're going to buy a new one, read this review.

http://www.lenstip.com/115.4-article-Polarizing_filters_test_Results_and_summary.html
Jul 8, 2013 10:26:20   #
Terra Australis
 
Noela wrote:
Needless to say, any help or direction is greatly appreciated.


If all that has happened is the circlip has come away, it is easy to fix.
Just push the rotating element back into the mount and push the circlip in with a plastic knitting needle or simillar.
Jul 8, 2013 10:51:45   #
WAL
 
Isn't it time the manufactures of filters address this problem? I have seen filters stuck on in ways that seem unbelievable. The old battery compartments that used the coin to open them where another pain. I supervised a large manufacturing plant and feel comfortable around these things. I have run into some that appeared to have weld themselves on the camera. Even using various techniques to get a hold on the filters I worry about apply excess torque to the lens. The newer auto focus lenses have a particularly cheap feel to them.
Please share any techniques or cures that you have tried, successful or not. I have been tempted to apply powdered graphite or a stable grease but rested the temptation.
Jul 8, 2013 10:59:08   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
WAL wrote:
Isn't it time the manufactures of filters address this problem? I have seen filters stuck on in ways that seem unbelievable. The old battery compartments that used the coin to open them where another pain. I supervised a large manufacturing plant and feel comfortable around these things. I have run into some that appeared to have weld themselves on the camera. Even using various techniques to get a hold on the filters I worry about apply excess torque to the lens. The newer auto focus lenses have a particularly cheap feel to them.
Please share any techniques or cures that you have tried, successful or not. I have been tempted to apply powdered graphite or a stable grease but rested the temptation.
Isn't it time the manufactures of filters address ... (show quote)

I've been tempted to use the graphite, but I never have. Others have suggested using the graphite from a pencil.

My solution is to make sure they are attached but not tight. As I'm out, I'll loosen and tighten the filter a spec, just to make sure it can move. Fortunately, I haven't had one stick on yet, although I do have a pair of filter wrenches.
Jul 8, 2013 11:44:52   #
dmeyer (a regular here)
 
I, too, have had difficulty removing a Hoya CPL filter. I had tightened it pretty snug after having it come off previously while turning to adjust the polarization. When I resorted to using a wrench, I put a rubber jar lid grip around the ring to protect it. Now I keep a rubber jar lid grip in my camera bag and find that I can get the filter off without the wrench with just the gripper. I'm just more careful about the degree of torque I use putting it on.
 
Jul 8, 2013 11:55:25   #
skidooman
 
Yep, mine gets stuck really easy. I find myself using my Cokin system more often, with a graduated ND filter, or even just a ND filter. Circular polarizer doesn't see a lot of action anymore. It's kind of frustrating to get it off the lens most times.
Jul 9, 2013 09:22:05   #
romanticf16
 
jerryc41 wrote:
I've been tempted to use the graphite, but I never have. Others have suggested using the graphite from a pencil.
My solution is to make sure they are attached but not tight. As I'm out, I'll loosen and tighten the filter a spec, just to make sure it can move. Fortunately, I haven't had one stick on yet, although I do have a pair of filter wrenches.


I'm wondering if a SLIGHT dab of the anti seize compound sold for Spark Plugs applied to the threads would help? Brass filter rings on Aluminum lens mounts don't have the problem- it is when the two threads are of the same material that they bind.
Jul 9, 2013 10:13:56   #
jerryc41 (a regular here)
 
romanticf16 wrote:
I'm wondering if a SLIGHT dab of the anti seize compound sold for Spark Plugs applied to the threads would help? Brass filter rings on Aluminum lens mounts don't have the problem- it is when the two threads are of the same material that they bind.

I wouldn't. That stuff is a mess if it gets on your hands - or anything else. It would impossible not to get it on your hands when working with filters. Graphite or a touch of silicone spray should work. You could dab some silicone onto the threads with a toothpick or Q-Tip.
Jul 9, 2013 11:04:03   #
Armadillo
 
WAL wrote:
Isn't it time the manufactures of filters address this problem? I have seen filters stuck on in ways that seem unbelievable. The old battery compartments that used the coin to open them where another pain. I supervised a large manufacturing plant and feel comfortable around these things. I have run into some that appeared to have weld themselves on the camera. Even using various techniques to get a hold on the filters I worry about apply excess torque to the lens. The newer auto focus lenses have a particularly cheap feel to them.
Please share any techniques or cures that you have tried, successful or not. I have been tempted to apply powdered graphite or a stable grease but rested the temptation.
Isn't it time the manufactures of filters address ... (show quote)


WAL,

At lest one filter manufacturer has addressed the problem, they use a threaded filter holder that allow several different holder adapter rings to attach to different lenses. The adapter ring threads into the lens filter threads, and has a wide shoulder to slip the filter holder onto.

The problem many people have with the traditional lens filters is the very thin filter ring that threads into an objective lens, and the filter material itself. If there is any slight amount of contamination between the filter threads and the lens threads, when the filter is tightened onto the lens, the threads will begin to bind. When it becomes time to remove the filter the binding becomes worse, and to add insult to injury, the thin filter ring begins to flex inward as pressure is applied to grip the filter ring, causing increased binding.

To overcome this nasty trait try the following, it is usually successful.
1. With the lens attached to camera, place camera on its back on a soft, but secure material.
2. Place the palm of your hand on the leading edge of the filter. On high quality filters the filter ring has a knurled edge for gripping.
3. Use only enough downward pressure to make contact with the filter ring and rotate it counterclockwise. Gently rotate the filter counterclockwise until you can continue removing the filter with the tips of your fingers.
4. If this method fails you may have to take camera/lens/filter to a camera repair facility to have them remove the filter with specially made tools.

Manufactures that have overcome this problem use a filter ring adapter so one filter can fit many different lens sizes, and the adapter shoulder absorbs all the squeezing pressure so the threads do not bind. If you are interested look for Cokin Filters and adapters.

Michael G
Jul 9, 2013 13:38:26   #
speters (a regular here)
 
Almost all of my filters are from B&W and I never had a problem, I have a couple variable ND and CPL filters, that are now more than 40 years old, but work like on the first day.
 
Jul 9, 2013 14:37:48   #
Peter Boyd
 
Terra Australis wrote:
If all that has happened is the circlip has come away, it is easy to fix.
Just push the rotating element back into the mount and push the circlip in with a plastic knitting needle or simillar.


While this will work, you must ensure that you put the filter back in the holder the right way round because if you have the wrong glass surface facing outward it will not work. To make sure it is the right way round look through it while rotating it to make sure it is reducing reflections from a suitable surface. Hope this makes sense.
Jul 10, 2013 10:28:13   #
RichardSM
 
I have found the filter made of cheap aluminum cause this problem most of the time. It is best to purchase ones made of brass it the dislike metal that works well, the like metal bond to each other.


WAL wrote:
Isn't it time the manufactures of filters address this problem? I have seen filters stuck on in ways that seem unbelievable. The old battery compartments that used the coin to open them where another pain. I supervised a large manufacturing plant and feel comfortable around these things. I have run into some that appeared to have weld themselves on the camera. Even using various techniques to get a hold on the filters I worry about apply excess torque to the lens. The newer auto focus lenses have a particularly cheap feel to them.
Please share any techniques or cures that you have tried, successful or not. I have been tempted to apply powdered graphite or a stable grease but rested the temptation.
Isn't it time the manufactures of filters address ... (show quote)
 
Main Photography Discussion
Home | Latest Digest | Back to Top | All Sections
Contact us | Privacy policy | Terms of use
UglyHedgehog.com - Forum
Copyright 2011-2016 Ugly Hedgehog, Inc.